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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 8, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is the ease. the headlines. newly—elected president emmanuel macron vows to fight the forces of division that undermine france. i'm damian grammaticus live in paris where we'll be bringing you the latest reaction to the election of emanuel macron and we'll asking what does this mean for the uk and it's brexit negotiations. theresa may suggests the conservatives will — again — promise to cut net migration to the "tens of thousands" in their election manifesto. labour targets children's health — and says it will ban alljunk food tv adverts before the 9pm watershed. facebook places adverts in british newspapers with tips on how to spot fake news in the run—up to the the general election. and turning the tide — an irish beach that was washed away by a storm over 30 years ago reappears almost overnight emmanuel macron has attended his
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first official event as president elect of france — less than 2a hours after the polls closed. he joined president hollande at a world war two commemoration in paris. monsieur macron beat marine le pen convincingly in yesterday's presidential run off vote — but in his victory speech last night said he wanted to unite the country. that's got to the french capital and aiming dramatic asjoins us now from paris. good afternoon. emmanuel macron has already begun the work of preparing to take power on sunday, discussing with his advisers what is best that should be entered as prime minister's choice should be. earlier
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he was here, celebrate his marking the anniversary of victory in europe today and we had a powerful image, there was the outgoing president francois hollande side—by—side with the incoming mr dramatic music. mr holland had plucked mr mata from obscurity to bring him into his government and make him becoming minister. mr mata. every time ahead of the election, james reynolds has the today's events. emmanuel macron, the election winner, now prepares to lead his country. this morning in paris, he joined the outgoing president francois hollande at the ceremony to mark ve day. the horror of the second world war convinced old enemies france and germany to form an alliance which then became the
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basis of the european union. it is a struggling project which the new president promises to revive. emmanuel macron now inherits one of the most powerful positions in europe and all of the symbolism that goes with it. he becomes the youngest french leader since napoleon, his own battles are remembered here. the crowd knows the new leader will face problems of his own. french people hope he will change a lot of things, it might be tough for him but we hope that. translation: it's not going to be easy but i hope he will do some good work. above all, i hope he won't forget the little people. are not sure he's very coherent with his ideas. the idea of being from left or right. i don't really trust this. world leaders have sent mr macron their congratulations. theresa may says she looks forward to working
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with him on a wide range of shared priorities. president trump says that he very much look forward to working with mr macron. germany angela merkel describes his election asa angela merkel describes his election as a victory for a strong and united europe. and russia's president putin calls unfancied in new leader to bridge the divide between moscow and paris. in the hours after the polls closed, in between those many telephone calls with world leaders, emmanuel macron celebrated with his supporters. translation: what we've done for so many months, there is no comparison, there is no equivalent to that everybody was saying to us it was impossible. but they didn't know anything about france. at night mr macron defeated opponent marine le pen danced away her defeat. she insists she is now the main
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opposition force in france, she will prepare for the next election in five years' time. emmanuel macron will know that he has little time to waste. he's promised to set the direction of both his country and the wider european union. he takes office on sunday. emmanuel macron has built an extraordinarily successful political movement in a very short time but what about the challenges ahead? with me now is my. dark, paris correspondent for the financial times. what for you does mr macron have to focus on now? that minute 3-1 have to focus on now? that minute 3—1 last night, all the people started talking about the legislative elections next month. he needs to win a majority in order to push through his agenda otherwise he may have to cohabit with another party and risks been pulled into a mire of deals and shenanigans even
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before he has started. you say he needs to win a majority, he has precisely zero mps in parliament. this extraordinary. can he do that in the space of a few weeks with these elections coming up? it's unprecedented territory and french electro history, this party created a year ago that he has zero members of parliament. the polls say that he will get somewhere between 240 and 290 people in the parliament. he needs 280 to form a majority saw the polls suggest he is nearly there and it could happen but a lot depends on the campaigning in the next couple of weeks and a lot will depend on how some of his rivals on the left, the centre—right and the front national marshall themselves for this next electoral contest. the challenge for them is do they cooperate with this new force or do they seek to undermine it? there
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real fear is that if they cooperate they will get eaten up completely on they will get eaten up completely on the socialist party and the republican party could cease to exist and just become branches. can we turn to the loser of last night's election, marine le pen, she said she got 11 million votes and that was unprecedented, double the share that her father got when he ran for president. on the one hand, 11 million people voted for a party where the leader is an teu, anti—globalisation, she compared muslims praying on the street to the nazi occupation of france, this is an extreme candidate and got 11 million votes, 35% of the population, that's extraordinary. it was a big disappointment compare to what she felt and a lot of people in her party felt she might have got. some polls in the year put her on 45%. for that, 35% is a big blow. some polls in the year put her on
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45%. forthat, 35% is a big blowm 45%. forthat, 35% is a big biowm she has talked about rebranding her party and changing its name. how might that all work out? you her position is not vulnerable, she will stay at the top but there is a battle for the soul of the front about national for those who want to you want to work on economic issue and globalisation on those who want to focus on immigration and emigration. this conflict was kept beneath the surface for the election but now it's doubling over and there are people who want the party to go back to its roots and she is saying the opposite, no we're going to expand the party and become the party in france, the opposition to macron, the party of the have—nots, the losers of globalisation against mr macron. a lot of change still to watch happening in france. 0thers watching it including from across the channel in the uk, so what will
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be election of mr macron me for brexit negotiations? france is one of the pivotal players in the european union and mr macron will play a key role in the upcoming brexit talks and this morning president—elect mr macron‘s and pfizer said mr macron would be a ha rd pfizer said mr macron would be a hard negotiator but wouldn't want it punish britain for its decision to leave the eu. chris morris looks at what kind of negotiating position the new french president is likely to take. the first thing you need to know about emmanuel macron is that he isa know about emmanuel macron is that he is a passionate pro—european. know about emmanuel macron is that he is a passionate pro-european. he campaigned on an overtly pro—eu platform. is that likely to make a tough nut to crack when it comes to brexit negotiations? yes. but france was always likely to play that role. if you look at some of the things he's said on brexit during the campaign, the language is pretty striking. in one interview, he called brexit a cry and said, was quick to happen is not taking back control, its servitude. let's have a
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listen to the most recent comments he's made in the last few days. brexit is not a walk in the park, on a financial basis and in terms of organisation and consequences. don't forget that brexit is not at the top of his list of priorities. he has vowed to reform france and a possible partnership with germany to reform the eu. plenty to be getting on with. of course there will be a french parliamentary election in june, so he will be paying far more attention to that than to the start of negotiations on brexit. he will campaignfor of negotiations on brexit. he will campaign for the rights of french citizens in the uk. he would love some financial firms to move from london to paris and one other issue he has talked about, a reform of the deal under which british immigration checks take place in calais on
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french soil. it's not an eu agreement, its bilateral but it will play into the brexit debate and the prime minister has been talking about this. as for the agreement, actually it works the benefit of both the uk and france and obviously in the government that selected after the 8th of june in the government that selected after the 8th ofjune we will sit down and talk to mr macron and others about how that system has worked. so plenty of challenges ahead but also worth bearing in mind that the election of mr macron will increase the confidence of eu insiders, especially when you consider what the alternative could have been, however unlikely, a president who would have been fundamentally anti—eu and would have plunged the whole project into chaos. have had a lot here about the need for strong and stable government. it could be that a stronger and more stable eu will be a better negotiating partnerfor the uk in the months to come. it's worth seeing that on the
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campaign, emmanuel macron, i met him on the campaign and he said then and repeated his approach to brexit would be that eu comes first, he would be that eu comes first, he would defend eu interests and that's why partly his election has been welcomed across the eu, key to watch there would be his first meeting which is likely to be with the german chancellor angela merkel and he has talked about rebuilding that franco— german engine at the heart of the eu and that should come pretty soon after his inauguration. for now, from paris, back to london. theresa may has said that leaving the european union will help the uk achieve a target of reducing annual net migration to the tens of thousands. the target set by david cameron in 2010 has never been made. recent figures that annual net migration at 273,000 but the bbc understands the pledge will be included in the conservative election manifesto. this is me told supporters that migration levels we re supporters that migration levels were having an impact on public services and low paid workers. chris mason reports. prime minister.
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applause immigration, the issue that for many was crucial in last year's eu referendum, and 12 months on, it is back in this year's general election. we will continue to say that we do want to bring net migration down to sustainable levels. we believe that is the tens of thousands, and of course, once we leave the european union, we will have the opportunity to ensure that we have control of our borders here in the uk. if all of this feels a tad familiar, well, that's because it is. net migration is the number of people coming to the uk minus the number leaving. here is the conservative manifesto from 2010. it says, we will take steps to take net migration back to tens of thousands a year, not hundreds of thousands. they didn't manage it. fast forward five years to the 2015 conservative manifesto — we will keep our ambition of delivering annual net migration in the tens of thousands. again, they didn't achieve it. the nearest the came was in 2012, at 177,000, and
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the furthest was in 2015, at 332,000. the target is unlikely to be met with the current policies that are in place, so quite aside from the brexit scenario, non—eu net migration currently stands at about 165,000, so that alone is 65,000 over the net migration target. ukip, crushed in last week's local elections, want to sound much, much tougher than the tories, and have an immigration policy where it would be one in, one out. i can announce today that ukip will go into this election with a policy of balanced migration, which means zero net immigration over the next five year period. the snp and the liberal democrats said economic interests
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should drive immigration policy. labour accused the conservatives of an emblematic broken promise on the issue. chris mason, bbc news. the bbc has unveiled details of its general election debate programmes. david dimbleby will host two question time specials in which leaders will face audience questions and there will also be a seven—way debate with senior party figures. a little earlier our media correspondent david sillito gave us more. these are the bbc‘s plans, a series of two question time specials on the first one will feature theresa may and jeremy corbyn in the same programme but not sharing a stage. they will appear in sector fleet facing questions from the audience and another question time special two days later with other party leaders appearing in an election questions later in the evening. all the main leaders will face interviews from andrew newell and on
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the one show tomorrow will feature theresa may and her husband philip. then there will be this debate, a seven—week debate featuring senior party figures along with another radio one debate. ten hours of coverage on the bbc but not the debate they wanted to have with the party leaders. the headlines. newly elected president emmanuel macron vows elected president emmanuel macron vows to fight the forces of the vision that undermine france. theresa may suggests the conservatives will, again, promise to cut net migration to the tens of thousands in their election ma nifesto. thousands in their election manifesto. labour targets child ren‘s health and says it will ban alljunk food tv adverts until the 90 watershed. i'm standing in the bed of what was the river called in hertfordshire. the dry weather means there is a lot of concern about river levels are
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around the country, the water company says we can all do our bit to preserve supplies. in sport, the british and irish lions head coach warren gatland says he completely understand and respect ben youngs‘s decision to withdraw from the tour to new zealand because of family reasons. his sister—in—law has been diagnosed with terminal cancer. chelsea will be one win away from the title if they beat middlesbrough tonight. the midfielder n'golo kante has received the football writers player of the year award to go with his pfa award. and dan evans has been knocked out of the madrid open, losing in the first round to robin haase. he slipped to fourth in the british rankings but says he doesn't recognise the number three as british. a two year old girl is seriously ill in hospital —
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after several dogs got into the garden where she was playing and attacked her. she suffered injuries to her head and body — but they are described as ‘not life—threatening'. police have seized eleven dogs from a nearby house in the toxteth area of liverpool — and a 35 year old man has been arrested on suspicion of having a dangerous dog or dogs out of control. 0ur correspondent yunus mulla sent this update from merseyside police headquarters merseyside police have described this as an horrific attack which has left the two—year—old girl with extensive injuries. with me i have superintendent mark wiggins. you are pa rt superintendent mark wiggins. you are part of the investigation team, what is the condition of the girl? the two—year—old girl was attacked by the dogs yesterday underwent extensive surgery yesterday evening and she is now recovering from the extent of her ordeal. she will clearly need further medical intervention as we go forward in the next few weeks and months and at this stage we don't know how much of that will be required. what do we understand happened here? what we know is that yesterday afternoon at
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herand's know is that yesterday afternoon at her and's address she was playing with two of her young relatives who we re with two of her young relatives who were six and four and somehow we know that from a neighbouring property a number of dogs got into the back garden and whilst the ant was able to get the four in the six—year—old to safety, the two—year—old was attacked by those dogs, sustaining these horrific injuries. the aunt did manage to separate the dogs from the two—year—old child and bring her to safety where she was airlifted to hospital. the dogs managed to get into this property, how did they get in? that's part of the investigation at this time, we don't know how they got them but we think it was through a fence. that was something we will ask when we speak to the victim in terms of the aunt and two relevant neighbours and to the person we've arrested because we have in custody arrested because we have in custody a 35—year—old male who we believe to be one of those dogs and he is assisting us with our enquiries. the dogs involved, questions if they we re dogs involved, questions if they were a band breed, what type of dogs we re were a band breed, what type of dogs were they? the dogs were not a
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banned breed, we had them assess and they were american bully dogs and they were american bully dogs and they are not prohibited, dog of that nature is not an offence but what is an offence is to have a dog that is dangerously out of control and a public place and the legislation has change recently that if the offence is committed in private it is also against the law and that's the offe nce against the law and that's the offence we are investigating. house prices have fallen in the last three months for the first time in 5 years. the halifax mortgage lender says prices fell by 0.2% — the first quarterly fall since november 2012. it's blamed a squeeze on household finances, caused by rising inflation. facebook has placed adverts in british newspapers with ten tips on how to spot fake news online. the website has also closed thousands of accounts linked to false stories — ahead of the general election next month. the company advises users to "be sceptical of headlines" and to check the website address. the move comes as increasing numbers of people use the site as one of their main news sources.
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this report from our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. it's a term that became familiar during last year's american presidential election. fake news stories made up to make money or to act as political propaganda and it is facebook which has taken much of the blame for spreading stories such as these. now, the social network says it's doing everything it can to tackle the problem in the uk with these newspaper adverts part of this effort. facebook says it's stepping up the battle against fake news and giving its users a guide to spotting for stories. it's closing tens of thousands of fake uk accounts which might spread misinformation. and it's working with fact—checking organisations during the election campaign. what happens if a friend share is what you think is a fake news story with you? it's not blindingly
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obvious but goya, you go down to report post, i think it shouldn't be on facebook is the choice here. you continue and then you get the option at the bottom that it's a fake news story and once you've done that it should end up with an independent fa ct should end up with an independent fact checking organisation. 0ne should end up with an independent fact checking organisation. one of those organisations thinks the social network needs to do more. there's a responsibility for facebook to look at how do we change facebook to look at how do we change facebook itself to make it easier for people to spot sites that are not what they are cracked up to be on things that need to be checked out in more detail. this is a good start from facebook but it should only be the beginning. in germany there is a drive to combat fake news in the run—up to the elections and whether —— our own general election four weeks with the parties know that facebook is a key battle ground. they will have identified exactly the types of voters they would like to target and the types of m essa g es would like to target and the types of messages they would like to
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target them with and facebook will be the means of delivering them. this bid will be the means by how understand the response of those m essa 9 es understand the response of those messages and change them and evolve them based on that response. more than 30 million people get news and political messages from facebook during the election campaign. the social network says it's doing its best to make sure that what they read is not fake. there are fears of a drought in the uk this summer — as a lack of rainfall in the last few months has left some rivers and reservoirs with dwindling water levels. this met office map of rainfall in april shows that the majority of the uk experienced less than half the average amount — with southern england seeing the driest weather. andy moore is in london colney in hertfordshire, where affinity water has become the first water company in the country to start advising customers about water usage. what's the advice? this is the best of the river river colne in
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hertfordshire. the section here is basically the bone dry. local people say they haven't seen it like this is the summer of 1976. the problem normally is not low water levels, its high water levels. the casual use of photographs of flooding back in 2009 when the section of the river was basically turned into a giant lake. the current problem of low water levels is something that's been reported around the country. the environment agency says it is monitoring the situation. affinity is the water company that operates in this area and they say that they've had less than half of their normal rainfall sincejuly last they've had less than half of their normal rainfall since july last year and they say that we can all do our bit to save water, to help preserve supplies and minimise the possibility of restrictions later on in the summer. 0ne possibility of restrictions later on in the summer. one way we can do that to turn off the tap when we're brushing our teeth and then simple
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step alone would save about 6500 litres of water every year. we all know how fickle the british weather is, we might get a lot of rainfall and this will soon become a distant memory but of the dry weather continues, then we could just could have problems with our water supplies this summer. some of us are old enough to remember 1976 and comparisons are being drawn with that year and they had to appoint a broad minister. that's right, we're not there yet. none of the water companies are talking about hall's pipe bands, the environment agency arejust pipe bands, the environment agency are just saying that the levels are lower than normal. none of the water companies are yet talking explicitly about hall's pipe bands. what they are seeing is what they are always think that we can all do our bit, this country does have problems with its water supply sometimes. we can a lwa ys its water supply sometimes. we can always be careful about our water supply so we can do those things like taking a shower instead of a
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bath. talking about preserving the supplies we have at the moment but not talking about explicitly restrictions like that. we are not there yet. a beach that was washed away 33 years ago has re—appeared after a freak tide. the beach on the irish island of achill disappeared in 1984 after storms washed the sand away leaving only rock. the result was almost all of the hotels and cafes in the village were forced out of business as visitor numbers collapsed. but a ten day freak tide in april caused hundreds of thousands of tonnes of sand to be dumped exactly where the beach used to be, creating a new 300 metre sandy beach. emmet callaghan has lived in dooagh village all his life and works for achill tourism — hejoins us now. good to have you with us. tell us how this happened, perfect timing for the summer season. exactly. i
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join you from a absolutely glorious day here, over 20 celsius. the beach itself has come back over a ten day period. there have been hundreds of caravans, “— period. there have been hundreds of caravans, —— hundreds of tonnes of sand has been deposited here and the people are enjoying it. people walking their dogs on the beach at the moment and tourists are coming back. i know the island has five blue flag beaches but you can never have too many of those. what do you hopeifs have too many of those. what do you hope it's going to mean for tourism on the island ? hope it's going to mean for tourism on the island? tourism on the island is extremely important, even the last week, the influx of people to the area that came down to want to see our beach and see the beach that has reappeared after such a long term, people are really enjoying it and it's really good news i could feel—good factor on the island. can
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you show us some feel—good factor on the island. can you show us some more feel—good factor on the island. can you show us some more of the beach as you talk to us? tell us about the impact on the area when this beach washed away. the impact was devastating. we did have a few hotels in the area as you can see behind me, the tide isjust coming ina behind me, the tide isjust coming in a little bit but we still have the beautiful golden sandy shore. hotels in the area were very busy up until the 1980s. more recently our local shop was closed. hoping a bitch is back, it will hopefully rejuvenate the area. we can see the dog walkers, it looks absolutely glorious. i know yourfamily has dog walkers, it looks absolutely glorious. i know your family has a really close connection to the speech, tell us about about that and also about concerns that local people might have it might wash away again. exactly. i have a big connection to the beach. my
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great—great—grandfather was in charge of when the seaweed was washed in, the people from the village would come and take out the seaweed and it was used for fertilising their fields and crops. i'm the fifth generation of the family. people in the area aren't that worry, they're delighted that this year but a little bit of worry that it might call it again. fingers crossed, we are here now and the golden sands are back and hopefully we can keep the beach. po-faced please visit for many generations to come. “— please visit for many generations to come. —— hopefully it will be there for generations to come. blue sky there, what about the rest of the forecast it has been dry across the uk for quite some time. that will continue for a few more
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days but there is some rain on the way. it is lurking out there in the atlantic. before then, we are left with a dry picture across the uk. the rest of the afternoon has some lovely sunshine. much cloudier and breezy and call for the eastern side. on the coast you might not get the double figures through the afternoon. further west, 17, 18, 19 degrees. the winds are quite light. through this evening we will see the cloud drifting back in from the east. maybe the odd spot of light rain. there will still be some brea ks rain. there will still be some breaks in the cloud. it will be quite chilly getting into the bottom end of single figures for stop most major towns and cities 8 degrees. a cloudy day on tuesday. generally speaking more clout. that is the highest of the temperatures. the president—elect of france, emmanuel macron, is working to form a new government, following his victory in the run—off vote yesterday. the 39—year—old will assume power on sunday. theresa may says leaving the eu will help the uk achieve a reduction in annual net migration to the tens of thousands.
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the target, set in 2010, has never been met , but will appear again in the conservative election manifesto. labour are putting health at the heart of their campaigning today , setting out plans to tackle childhood obesity by banning junk food adverts during all programming before the 9pm watershed. the social networking site facebook is placing adverts in newspapers with tips on how to spot fake news in the run—up to the uk general election. let's head to the bbc sport centre. good afternoon to you both. the british and irish lions head coach warren gatland says he fully respects and understands ben young's decision to pull out of the summer tour to new zealand for family reasons. his sister—in—law has been diagnosed with terminal cancer. scotland's greg laidlaw has been called up to replace in the squad. the interesting thing from my point of view, we completely understand that. part of values i have always said, and we say to the players when we meet this afternoon, as far as i am concerned, it is about family come first. he has made that decision, and we know how close they are as well. so we fully respect
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that decision. 0ur are as well. so we fully respect that decision. our thoughts go out to them. mauro itoje will be the youngest member of that british and irish lions squad in new zealand. the 22—year—old says just as he used to look up the ugo monye and topsy 0jojoke he now wants to look up the ugo monye and topsy 0jo joke he now wants to to look up the ugo monye and topsy 0jojoke he now wants to inspire to look up the ugo monye and topsy 0jo joke he now wants to inspire the next generation of black rugby players. you look around and most of the schools i went to new look around and there are not many black quys around and there are not many black guys playing rugby. not as many everyday when you watch premiership games. even general international games. even general international games. it is changing a little bit now. there is more of that that definitely these were the guys i looked up to as a kid. daniel evans says fellow player aljaz bedene should not be considered british. evans made the comments after losing
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in straight sets to the dutchman robert haas at the madrid open. evansis robert haas at the madrid open. evans is fourth in the british rankings but he doesn't recognise the number three, the slovenian born bedene, who qualified for great britain on residency grounds three yea rs britain on residency grounds three years ago. you are four at the moment. aljaz bedene being the third. oh, so i'm three, ok. it is nothing to do with aljaz bedene. i like him, it is not confrontational in any way, but to me it doesn't sit well if you play for another country. i don't feel bad about him or anything like that, just for me it isa or anything like that, just for me it is a bit baffling as to why. and now he lives in slovenia as well. i don't think he really believes he is british. that is just the citizenship rule. it isjust a bit
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different, isn't it? chelsea could be champions by the end of the week. they play middlesbrough at stamford bridge. the blues midfielder n'golo ka nte bridge. the blues midfielder n'golo kante should have a spring in his step after picking up another world. already named pfa player of the year they did by his peers, today the football writers made him their player of the season. he won the premier league with leicester last year. winter night and middlesbrough will be whether gaiters, and then chelsea will take the title if they can then beat west brom on friday. in this part of the season for sure it is not easy. every game is very tough, because there is a lot of pressure. it is important it is part ofa pressure. it is important it is part of a period that you don't make m ista kes of a period that you don't make mistakes because it is very difficult then to recover. but we are ready to fight, we are ready to play these games. the confidence and
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the belief from players we have seen in recent weeks is there. it isjust that in the last certainly the sunderland and manchester city game that you saw everything coming together. and those four points out of six will give us plenty of confidence going into the chelsea game. that is all the sport for now. let's return to the main news, the election of a emmanuel macron as french president. the youngest person ever to hold the job, french president. the youngest person ever to hold thejob, a man without previous experience of elected office, and with a party that was created just a year ago. with me is sir peter ricketts, the former uk ambassador to france to france until last year. you know him quite well. used to go and see him very often. it is an extraordinary rise in the last four yea rs. extraordinary rise in the last four years. it is one that you predicted when you spoke to us if you months ago but nevertheless extraordinary,
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as you say. ago but nevertheless extraordinary, as you say. how? how has it happen? well, he saw an opening that both the main political parties were very unpopular in france, and he saw a mix of issues that could be attractive. so liberal economic lead, reforming, pro—european, tough on security, and with that extraordinary charm and that freshness that meant he came with no political baggage. he didn't come with a past, like so many french politicians, and that mix has just worked. the difficulty with that is you have to prove yourself at some point. how much pressure is he under? he has gone from being an economic counsellor in the ed lee to being a head of state, notjust a new political leader but actually the head of state and the french have seen him as ribs and think the whole nation and he is overcome all of those obstacles. i am sure now he can go on to attract enough support in parliament in the elections next month to be able to govern. we were just seeing him with president hollande this morning. as an act to follow, what are his priorities
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going to be? is it going to be reaffirming that relationship with germany, or a wider eu issue? he will want to get on with reforming france. he has had the courage to campaignfor france. he has had the courage to campaign for reforms, and then to say if i'm elected and going to do them. that is not what most french presidential candidates have done, they have normally done that before they have normally done that before the campaign. he has a mandate to reform, get unemployed were down get the economy moving, and on europe i think he will first and foremost talk to germany where they will be delighted that his arrival. and brexit will come some way down his priority list. delighted might understated. you can on this tear the sigh of relief across europe at his election. pro eu as we have been saying. some reports that he is fairly pro—british as well forced up how do you think he will approach what will be a difficult couple of yea rs ? what will be a difficult couple of years? he knows as well, he speaks english, he was quite accomplished tah used to coming to england, he
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was a french banker here for a while. britain leaving the european union will be an enormous disappointment everything he believes in. he will therefore want a tough deal, he will want to protect french interests first and foremost, european interest, but he isa foremost, european interest, but he is a deal—maker by heart. i think he will be a hard negotiator but he won't want a complete failure. and he will be completely referential within the eu as head of state of france. he will come he comes into that european council from day one asa that european council from day one as a huge heavyweight player. the european union always respect someone who has just got elected. he has come from a mandate from nowhere, he is president as well as head of government. whoever will be elected chancellor in germany in september will be the two focal points of the european council.m he the sort of bloke you can sit and have a pint with? yes, he is great
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fun, he has enormous personal charm and a real interest in people. everyone who went into his office came out thinking he is a friend of mine. so that enormous power to attract people is there. he has said this is a new page in the history of france, he says he wants to heal the divisions. easily said, easily promised but it is going to be tough. it is, because france is deeply divided and the fact that marine le pen got 35% of vote shows how divided france is. he does come in with no baggage as a fresh start and he won't convince all of those on the far right or the far left, but i think he can get quite a large group of people behind him in the sort of centre, centre right the ce ntre—left, sort of centre, centre right the centre—left, and govern effectively. he wants to show that it is possible to change france and therefore politicians to keep their promises. if he can do some of that it will be very good. by coming president, he has done that. —— by becoming president. now of course the biggest
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challenge is to deliver what he has been saying but he has got that mandate and now he has to show the french people that were once the president has said this is what i'm going to do, and then in power gone and done it. good of you to join us and done it. good of you to join us and a remarkable time. thank you. let's take you straight to leamington spa in warwickshire and the labour leaderjeremy corbyn is on the campaign trail there. i think we can bring you those pictures injust a think we can bring you those pictures in just a second. think we can bring you those pictures injust a second. labour leading its campaign today on the issue of health, particularly the health of children, setting out plans to tackle childhood obesity by banning all junk food adverts plans to tackle childhood obesity by banning alljunk food adverts during programming before the 9pm watershed. let's just listen in programming before the 9pm watershed. let'sjust listen in to what is happening there. cheering it looks like he may say if you
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words, so let's listening. cheering can you hear me 0k? leamington, warwickshire, everyone who has come, thank you so much for making this such a spectacular occasion and exceeding all expectations. my name is matt weston. cheering some of you will know me. apologies ifi some of you will know me. apologies if i hadn't had a chance to say this until now, thank you so much if you voted for me last week. cheering and re—elected me as a county council, i did not put it on social media because i have been so exhausted and a bit of a maelstrom since then. i am really excited to have with us today a person who obviously needs no introduction, but
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i will give you just two additional... still waiting to hear from jeremy corbyn himself. we are going to come back to that when mr corbyn begins to speak. their priority today has been child health. the strategy on that aims to halve the number of overweight youngsters within ten years in an effort to curb the £6 billion annual cost to the nhs of obesity. setting up cost to the nhs of obesity. setting upa cost to the nhs of obesity. setting up a £250 million fund created by halving the amount of nhs spending on management consultant each year. so we will go back to leamington spa as soon as we can, but right now let's move onto one of the day pass like the main stories. facebook‘s effo rts like the main stories. facebook‘s efforts to fight what has been called fa ke efforts to fight what has been called fake news, it has placed adverts in british newspapers with ten tips on how to spot fake news online. with me is tom felle, writer and lecturer in news and digitaljournalism at city,
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university of london. tom, thank you for coming along. as little as 12 months ago, fake news wasn't a thing but now it is quite the phenomenon and it means different things to different people. absolutely. the big issue with fake news is we don't fully appreciate what exactly it is. as you say, it means or can the things. it could be innocent fake news, it could be propaganda, it could be commercially produced news that is just complete lies. this really came toa just complete lies. this really came to a head during the us presidential election. we know that the trump campaign spent close to 100 million on digital advertising, a significant amount of that was spent on facebook itself. that is not to say that he was necessarily producing fake news, but part of this issue is very much around facebook‘s responsibility to police itself, and it's not doing that. so itself, and it's not doing that. so it has issued these ten tips. what do you make of them and what you think of facebook‘s own record of
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weeding out fake news that appears on it? it is playing catch-up all the time, and reason is really i'm not sure that facebook is committed to weeding it out. it is making a whole lot of money out of fake news, thatis whole lot of money out of fake news, that is the reality here. and for fa ke that is the reality here. and for fake news makers, people who produce fa ke fake news makers, people who produce fake news makers, people who produce fake news are being rewarded by the facebook algorithm. they are getting tens of millions of viewers seeing that content. advertisers follow that. that is the big problem here. it is the money. in terms of what they have done today, it is a welcome start but it goes nowhere near the tackling the problem. how concerned should we be about the ability of fake news to influence significant events, like elections? i think we should be very concerned here. for a long time things have been relatively heavily regulated. in the uk newspapers can publish what they want, but they are fairly consistent in that you have labour supporting press and tory supporting press. facebook is a monopoly, there
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is nobody controlling what it is producing and that is quite dangerous. if you have enough money, you can buy enough influence and thatis you can buy enough influence and that is the reality on facebook. any signs that people are perhaps turning away from social media as a primary form of getting their news towards more traditional media, where they know there are journalists who already will have vetted and filtered out hopefully all of that fake news? the best antidote to fake news is real news. that is where we need to be heading, towards supporting in particular local journalism, towards supporting in particular localjournalism, in particular newspapers and traditional broadcasters who have a long tradition of producing, as you say, vetted, quality, facts checked news. that is not what facebook is doing with this latest initiative. it is not enough. it is a start. just perhaps finally, you would maybe ta ke perhaps finally, you would maybe take our viewers through a fewer of those top tips that facebook is mentioning, or perhaps tips of your own? the first tip i would say is don't trust anything you see on the
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internets. if you start from there and work back. the reality is we separated out the news producerfrom what we see now online. so if we see something from our friends we are more likely to trust it, but we shouldn't. that's the reality full stop so be sceptical, check out where the information is coming from. if you know the source of the information, do you trust the source? is it a real source? is it bbc .co .uk, or is it not quite correct. thanks very much. we like real news here. we will bring you some now. jeremy corbyn has taken to the podium. we can hearfrom him, he is on the campaign trail in leamington. to represent the needs of social care and mental health in our society. it is that serious, we have got to deal with it. but health is notjust about hospitals and mental health and social care. it is also about how we
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bring up ourchildren, social care. it is also about how we bring up our children, and what kind of support and care they get. so, this morning, john ashworth announced that we would stop the intensive advertising of unhealthy fa st intensive advertising of unhealthy fast foods on television aimed at children, not because we are killjoys, because the very opposite. we want our children to be born in the best circumstances and grow up as healthy as possible, because every child that is undernourished or obese, or both, actually becomes quite often the heart patient of the future, the cancer patient of the future, the cancer patient of the future, the cancer patient of the future, the diabetic of the future. it's about how we treat everybody in our community. sol it's about how we treat everybody in our community. so i am very proud of our community. so i am very proud of our pledge, our pledge that a labour government would ensure that every child in every primary school get a free meal every day, eaten together. cheering eaten together, because children
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grow up together, and let's look at education as the greatest opportunity for all of our children. but, under this tory government, so many schools around the country, head teachers in a terrible state of stress and distress because they have got to decide which teacher to sack, which teaching assistant to sack, which teaching assistant to sack, which teaching assistant to sack, which examine not to enter children for, which subject to right out of the curriculum. is it right that in 21st century britain we are asking parents to take part in collections to pay teachers's salaries? it cannot be right, we have got to properly fund our schools, so that all of our children, irrespective of the postcode where they were born, get the education they need and we demand to give them. cheering and so i say to teachers, i say the
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doctors, i said the nurses, i say to those that work so hard in so many of our public services, you've been subject now to seven years of pay freezes. in reality, you've taken a pay cut coming year in, year out, and a nurse was telling me this morning, she said i love myjob, i love the health service, i love what i do. but why is it society thinks so little of me that every year i get a pay cut? come on. there's greater levels of inequality in modern britain that have been almost everin modern britain that have been almost ever in our history, it's getting worse and worse, because wages are too low, because investment is too low, because our public services are underfunded, and because we have a taxation system that favours the super—rich, the wealthy and the big corporations. cheering
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and so the proposals we've already announced are all fully funded, and will be fully funded, and our manifesto will come out very soon, and you will see all the details of that which we are proposing to do. but, fundamentally, this election is about the kind of world and kind of society we want to believe in 0rton live in. let's go to our correspondence eleanor garnier who was not far from him correspondence eleanor garnier who was not farfrom him in leamington. this child health till he is discussing, this will be in their ma nifesto ? discussing, this will be in their manifesto? pelle yes, labour really focusing on the nhs today. but earlierjeremy corbyn was at the university of worcester, where he met student nurses, talking about labour's plans to halve childhood obesity over the next five to ten yea rs, obesity over the next five to ten years, and saying it is a really serious problem and that is why he
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wa nts serious problem and that is why he wants his party to be clamping down on those adverts, which are already banned during children's tv. but they want to extend that ban of adverts for unhealthy products up to 9pm, up to the 9pm watershed. that is just 9pm, up to the 9pm watershed. that isjust one of 9pm, up to the 9pm watershed. that is just one of the policies they announce today. they have also been talking about stopping hospitals charging for car parks at sites across england, saying it is unfair and it is a burden on nhs staff, but also patients and their families. the nhs is a key issue that labour will be campaigning on over the general election over the next four weeks. the party thinks it is an area where they can win over the electorate, and they know that many voters do treasure the nhs, and do haveit voters do treasure the nhs, and do have it as one of their priorities when they consider who they vote for. thank you very much. in a moment we will have a summary of the business news with jamie but first the headlines on bbc news. newly
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elected president emmanuel macron vows to fight the forces of division that undermine france will stop theresa may has suggested the conservatives will again promised to cut net migration to the tens of thousands in their election ma nifesto. thousands in their election manifesto. labour targets child ren's health, and says we will ban all junk food tv adverts until the 9pm watershed. good afternoon, i am jamie robertson. telecoms regulator 0fcom says it is "very concerned" about the rising cost of calling directory enquiries and plans to examine the situation. 0ne popular enquiry service — 118118 — recently increased its prices to a minimum of £8.98. but 0fcom says some firms charge even more than that — up to £10.50 a call. british gas owner centrica has repeated its opposition to a cap on energy bills — widely reported to be a conservative election policy.
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the firm said evidence from other countries suggests a cap could lead to higher prices. centrica has also proposed other ways of improving the energy market "without resorting to price regulation", the company said in a trading update. house prices have stagnated, according to the halifax bank. it blames a squeeze on household finances and a slower pace ofjob creation. the halifax house price index showed house prices between february and april were 0.2% lower than in the previous three months, the first quarterly fall since november 2012. the first offer was 22.3 billion dollars. they said no. the second was almost 24 billion. they said no again. then the offer was 29 billion. now they have said no yet again. they is akzo nobel, the dutch makers of dulux paints. and the offers are coming from its us competitor ppg. the question is why say no. akzo's board has consistently said the offers undervalue the company and that they can grow quite nicely on their own thank you very much.
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but some akzo shareholders think differently, and that 29 bilion dollars looks very tempting. and a short time ago the shares were down 2.5% in the netherlands. samira hussainjoins me now from the new york stock exchange. they have said no three times, where do we go from here? we have just heard from ppg who have released a statement after they were rejected again by the dutch company. they said they were really disappointed of course but there was no real indication of what will happen next. the next step is now the dutch company is open for a hostile ta keover company is open for a hostile takeover bid by ppg. what that means is that ppg can just present their offer directly to shareholders. there are some shareholders but think it is a really attractive deal, that the kinds of development the dutch company would have to make
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to match the kind of growth expected from a potential merger with the two companies, it is just from a potential merger with the two companies, it isjust not from a potential merger with the two companies, it is just not something the dutch company will be able to do. that said, that is going to be met with a lot of political opposition. it reminds me of the bids for unilever. a quick look at the markets. haven't changed much will stop after the french election, the result, we saw the euro gain. not much of change on the stock market but the euro is stronger. that is the business. straight to the weather now. good afternoon. the dry spell looks like it will continue for a few more days yet but there is some rain in the forecast, particularly as we head to the end of this week. at the moment it is dry birchley everywhere. we take a look at the satellite sequence, it shows this
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area of low pressure out the atlantic. that is what will change the script late thursday to friday. the moment a real the script late thursday to friday. the momenta real west— the script late thursday to friday. the moment a real west— east split across the uk with some pretty great conditions across the east. the odd spot of light rain and drizzle to go with that but further west a com pletely with that but further west a completely different story with plenty of sunshine, light winds and higher temperatures as well. if you are stuck underneath that cloud on the coast, temperatures may not even get the double figures, whereas further west, 19 or 20 degrees in a few places first up we will keep some of that cloud to the north and east of scotland but the bulk of scotland, another lovely day. temperatures in the upper teens in the north—west. also in northern ireland. that cloud pretty stubborn in places but head further west and there is plenty of sunshine to be had. there is plenty of sunshine to be ha d. m ostly there is plenty of sunshine to be had. mostly middle to upper teens. no problems with the uv levels. 0n
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the eastern side with the cloud cover. further west, the eastern side with the cloud cover. furtherwest, bear in the eastern side with the cloud cover. further west, bear in mind the sun is still pretty strong this time of year. as you head on into the evening, will see a fair bit of cloud drifting in from the east on that breeze but there will still be some breaks, particularly in southern, western and northern areas and where you get the breaks in the cloud it will turn quite chilly, evenin cloud it will turn quite chilly, even in major towns and cities. rural spots a bit below that. chilly start a tuesday and overall it will bea start a tuesday and overall it will be a slightly different day. we will see very light winds across the uk, and notably we will lose that easterly wind that is the coast where it has been pretty chilly in that breeze in recent days. more of a north—westerly breeze. lighter winds on the eastern side but still fairly cloudy and call underneath that cloud. still some breaks for southern and western areas and for scotla nd southern and western areas and for scotland and northern ireland it should be a pretty decent day. once again temperatures in the upper teens for many. it will be quite cool along that eastern coast. as we head towards dawn on wednesday, quite chilly. a fairly widespread
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rural frost particularly across england and wales where the skies will be clearest. a decent day on wednesday. more cloud for scotland and northern ireland, a bit more rain to the far north of the uk but it is late on thursday when we start to see the change. cloud and rain moving its way up from the south. some of that could be on the heavy side, maybe some rumbles of thunder but there is some rain on the way. this is bbc news. i'm damian grammaticas live in paris. the headlines at 3pm. newly—elected president emmanuel macron vows to fight the forces of division that undermine france. mr macron is a passionate
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pro—european — we'll look at the implications of his election for brexit. and also coming up on today's programme. theresa may suggests the conservatives will — again — promise to cut net migration to the "tens of thousands" in their election manifesto. labour targets children's health — and says it will ban alljunk food tv adverts before the 9pm watershed. facebook places adverts in british newspapers with tips on how to spot fake news in the run—up to the the general election. and turning the tide, an irish beach that was washed away by a storm over 30 years ago reappears almost overnight.
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